Quantcast
Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog



Channel Description:

SKYE on AOL

older | 1 | .... | 24 | 25 | (Page 26) | 27 | 28 | .... | 204 | newer

    0 0


    Cars and Trucks are piled on Interstate 10 in Southeast Texas on Thursday. (AP Photo/The Beaumont Enterprise, Guiseppe Barranco)

    BEAUMONT, Texas (AP) - Two people died and more than 80 people were hurt Thursday when at least 100 vehicles collided in Southeast Texas in a pileup that left trucks twisted on top of each other and authorities rushing to pull survivors from the wreckage.

    The collision occurred in extremely foggy conditions at about 8:45 a.m. Thanksgiving Day on Interstate 10 southwest of Beaumont, a Gulf Coast city about 80 miles east of Houston.

    A man and a woman were killed in a Chevy Suburban SUV crushed by a tractor trailer, the Texas Department of Public Safety told KFDM-TV.

    Officials at Acadian Ambulance service said at least 51 people have been taken to area hospitals and at least eight are critically hurt.

    According to DPS, a crash on the eastbound side of the highway led to other accidents in a dangerous chain reaction. There were multiple crashes on the other side of the highway as well.

    Jefferson County Sheriff's Office Deputy Rod Carroll told The Associated Press the fog was so thick that deputies didn't immediately realize they were dealing with multiple accidents.

    "It is catastrophic," Carroll said. "I've got cars on top of cars."

    I-10's eastbound lanes were re-opened Thursday evening after more than eight hours.

    Texas Department of Public Safety trooper Stephanie Davis told KFDM that two people in an SUV died after the crash. She said at least 100 cars and trucks were involved in the accident.

    Carroll said uninjured drivers tried to help as authorities sorted through the wreckage.

    "It's just people helping people," Carroll said. "The foremost thing in this holiday season is how other travelers were helping us when we were overwhelmed, sitting and holding, putting pressure on people that were injured."

    PHOTOS ON SKYE: 25 Indelible Images from Superstorm Sandy

     

    Permalink | Email this | Linking Blogs | Comments


    0 0


    The roller coaster from an amusement pier rests in the Atlantic Ocean in Seaside Heights, N.J., after the region was pounded by Superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

    SEASIDE HEIGHTS, N.J. (AP) - The remains of a roller coaster that was knocked off a New Jersey amusement pier by Superstorm Sandy and partially submerged in the Atlantic Ocean might be left there as a tourist attraction.

    Seaside Heights Mayor Bill Akers tells WNBC-TV in New York that officials have not made a decision on whether to tear down the coaster. But the mayor says he's working with the Coast Guard to see if the coaster is stable enough to leave it alone because he believes it would make "a great tourist attraction."

    Meanwhile, efforts to rebuild the storm-ravaged town are continuing.

    Demolition crews have removed the resort's damaged boardwalk. And Akers says construction on a new boardwalk is expected to begin in January and be ready by Memorial Day.

    PHOTOS ON SKYE: 25 Indelible Images from Superstorm Sandy

     

    Permalink | Email this | Linking Blogs | Comments


    0 0


    The Kermit The Frog balloon makes its way down New York's Central Park West onThursday. (AP Photo/ Louis Lanzano)

    NEW YORK (AP) - Victims of Superstorm Sandy in New York and elsewhere in the Northeast were comforted Thursday by kinder weather, free holiday meals and - for some - front row seats to the annual Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade.

    "It means a lot," said Karen Panetta, of the hard-hit Broad Channel section of Queens, as she sat in a special viewing section set aside for New Yorkers displaced by the storm.

    "We're thankful to be here and actually be a family and to feel like life's a little normal today," she said.

    The popular Macy's parade, attended by more than 3 million people and watched by 50 million on TV, included such giant balloons as Elf on a Shelf and Papa Smurf, a new version of Hello Kitty, Buzz Lightyear, Sailor Mickey Mouse and the Pillsbury Doughboy. Real-life stars included singer Carly Rae Jepsen and Rachel Crow of "The X Factor."

    The young, and the young at heart, were delighted by the sight and sound of marching bands, performers and, of course, the giant balloons. The sunny weather quickly surpassed 50 degrees.

    Alan Batt and his 11-year-old twins, Kyto and Elina, took in the parade at the end of the route, well away from the crowd and seemingly too far away for a good view. But they had an advantage: Two tall stepladders they hauled over from their apartment eight blocks away - one for each twin.

    "We're New Yorkers," the 65-year-old Batt said. "We know what we're doing."

    With the height advantage, "I get to see everything!" Kyto said.

    At nearby Greeley Square, social worker Lowell Herschberger, 40, of Brooklyn, sought in vain to tear his sons, 8-year-old Logan and 6-year-old Liam, from a foosball table set up in the tiny park as the balloons crept by on the near horizon.

    "Hey, guys - there's Charlie Brown," he said, pointing at the old standby balloon.

    The boys didn't look up.

    "I guess they're over it," the father said with a shrug.

    Mayor Michael Bloomberg was reflective Thursday as he praised police, firefighters, armed services personnel, sanitation workers and volunteers involved in the storm response. His office was coordinating the distribution of 26,500 meals at 30 sites in neighborhoods affected by Sandy, and other organizations also were pitching in.

    The disaster zones on Staten Island were flooded - this time with food and volunteers from Glen Rock, N.J., organized using social media.

    "We had three carloads of food," volunteer Beth Fernandez said. "The whole town of Glen Rock pitched in. ... It's really cool. It's my best, my favorite Thanksgiving ever."

    On Long Island, the Long Beach nonprofit Surf For All hosted a Thanksgiving event that fed 1,200 people. Carol Gross, 72, a Long Beach native, said she went to volunteer but was turned away because of a surplus of helpers.

    "A lot of people like me, old-timers, we've never seen anything like this horror," she said, recalling the destruction.

    Gross' brother, Jerry, who moved to Arizona in the 1960s, was stunned by what he saw when he returned for Thanksgiving.

    "To come back and see the boardwalk all devastated like it is, it's like going to Manhattan and finding Times Square gone," he said.

    George Alvarez, whose Toms River, N.J., home suffered moderate damage when Sandy hit the coast, said his family usually does "the traditional big dinner" on Thanksgiving. But this year, they chose to attend a community dinner held at an area church.

    "This storm not only impacted us, it impacted a lot of our friends, our community, our psyche," Alvarez said shortly before his family headed out for their meal. "We could have had our usual dinner here at home, but this year it felt like we should be with others who are experiencing the same concerns we are. We made it through this devastating storm, and that's something to celebrate."

    Across the country, other cities offered a mix of holiday cheer and acts of charity.

    Thousands of people made the most of the mild, sunny fall weather to watch Detroit's Thanksgiving parade, hours ahead of the Lions' annual home game.

    Floats and marching bands poured down Woodward Avenue on Thursday morning, with many spectators forgoing the cold-weather gear of past parades. Detroit's temperature hit 52 degrees at 11 a.m., with a warm wind blowing from the south.

    Parade participants included NASCAR driver Brad Keselowski, a 28-year-old Rochester Hills native and the first Michigan-born driver to win the Sprint Cup Series.

    In San Francisco, lines of the homeless and less fortunate began forming late Wednesday outside a church in the city's tough Tenderloin district that expected to serve more than 5,000 meals, said the Rev. Cecil Williams.

    "We must make sure people can overcome all adversities," Williams said. "You can, you will and you must."

    On New York City's Rockaway Peninsula, convenience store owner Mohamed Razack said he was able to open again Wednesday for the first time since the storm.

    "At first, I was very depressed, but now, I'm proud," said Mohamed Razack, 50. "We are the first store to open around here."

    PHOTOS ON SKYE: 25 Indelible Images from Superstorm Sandy

     

    Permalink | Email this | Linking Blogs | Comments


    0 0

    Submerged Roads and Burst Rivers as Bad Weather Strikes

    LONDON (AP) - England and Wales have been whipped by high winds and heavy rain, causing floods, downing trees and stranding drivers. Authorities in southern England say one man was killed after his car trapped under a bridge by the rising water.

    Gusts reached more than 86 mph in Wales' mountainous Capel Cruig overnight, while the rains set off a mini-landslide in the small southwestern England fishing port of Mevagissey, disrupting operations at the harbor. At midday Friday, England's Environment Agency still had 77 flood warnings in place.

    Train services were disrupted, roads closed and bridges restricted as Britons struggled to recover from the storms. The cross-Channel ferry linking England to France also reported minor delays.

    RELATED ON SKYE: The 10 Craziest Things to Go Airborne in a Storm

     

    Permalink | Email this | Linking Blogs | Comments


    0 0

    Auckland schoolteacher Paul Cowan was less than a mile away from New Zealand's Mount Tongariro on Wednesday when it started erupting - and he caught the whole thing on film. (Note strong language). "It was fantastic but it was actually a bit scary and everyone started running," he told the New Zealand Herald.

    The mountain is located in Tongariro National Park, the backdrop for many scenes in the "Lord of the Rings" trilogy.

    RELATED ON SKYE: Breathtaking Volcanic Eruptions Seen from Space

     

    Permalink | Email this | Linking Blogs | Comments


    Warnning: Do NOT Get Caught While Searching!!
    Your IP : - Country : - City:
    Your ISP TRACKS Your Online Activity! Hide your IP ADDRESS with a VPN!
    Before you searching always remember to change your IP adress to not be followed!
    PROTECT YOURSELF & SUPPORT US! Purchase a VPN Today!
    0 0


    Stormchaser Ozthunder says it was one of the "nastiest thunderstorms I've seen," as lightning bolts lit up the night sky Nov. 17 over Darling Downs in Queensland, Australia.

     

    Permalink | Email this | Linking Blogs | Comments


    0 0



    This nearly global mosaic of observations made by the Mars Color Imager on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on Nov. 18, 2012, shows a dust storm in Mars' southern hemisphere. Small white arrows outline the area where dust from the storm is at. NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

    A NASA spacecraft is keeping tabs on a vast dust storm on Mars that has spawned changes in the Martian atmosphere felt by two rovers on the planet's surface.

    The Martian dust storm was first spotted by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) on Nov. 10 and has been tracked ever since. The agency's Mars rover Opportunity has seen a slight drop in atmospheric clarity due to the storm. Meanwhile the newer Curiosity rover - which has a built-in weather station - has seen a drop in air pressure and slightly increased nighttime temperatures halfway around the planet from Opportunity, NASA officials said.

    "This is now a regional dust storm," Rich Zurek, NASA's chief Mars scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., said in a statement Wednesday. "It has covered a fairly extensive region with its dust haze and it is in a part of the planet were some regional storms have grown into global dust hazes."

    NASA is combining observations by the Curiosity rover and MRO to create a complete picture of the Martian dust storm. The Spain-built Rover Environmental Monitoring Station on Curiosity gives scientists a real-time look at conditions over the rover's position inside Gale Crater.

    The Mars Color Imager on MRO was built by Malin Space Science Systems in San Diego. It was Malin's Bruce Cantor who first spotted the storm in photos from the powerful Mars camera on Nov. 10. [Amazing Mars Photos by MRO Spacecraft]

    "For the first time since the Viking missions of the 1970s, we are studying a regional dust storm both from orbit and with a weather station on the surface," Zurek said.

    Because the dust from the current storm is absorbing sunlight instead of reflecting it, a warming effect 16 miles above the Martian tempest has been seen by MRO. The effect, first recorded by MRO's Mars Climate Sounder on Nov. 16, has led to a temperature increase of 45 degrees Fahrenheit so far.

    Warmer temperatures are not confined to the Martian south. The circulation of the Martian atmosphere has also led to a hot spot in the planet's northern polar regions. The temperature on Mars is typically about minus 80 degrees F, but can vary depending on location and the Martian season.

    Regional dust storms on Mars were observed in 2001 and 2007, but not between those years or in the time since. The Martian year lasts two Earth years, with major dust storm events following a seasonal pattern. Dust storm season on Mars began a few weeks ago as the Martian spring began in the planet's southern hemisphere, NASA officials said.

    "One thing we want to learn is why do some Martian dust storm get to this size and stop growing, while others this size keep growing and go global," Zurek said.

    A global dust storm on Mars could have implications for the Opportunity and Curiosity rovers. If the current dust storm were to expand to cover the Red Planet, the dust settling on Opportunity's solar panels could reduce the rover's power supply. Opportunity has been exploring the plains of Meridiani Planum since its 2004 landing on Mars.

    NASA's newer Mars rover Curiosity, meanwhile, would likely see increased haze in its photos of nearby terrain, as well as an above normal air temperature. The 1-ton Curiosity rover landed on Mars on Aug. 5 and is powered by a radioisotope thermoelectric generator that is unaffected by dust storms.

    Follow SPACE.com on Twitter @Spacedotcom. We're also on Facebook & Google+.

    Copyright 2012 SPACE.com, a TechMediaNetwork company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

    PHOTOS ON SKYE: 25 Indelible Images from Superstorm Sandy

     

    Permalink | Email this | Linking Blogs | Comments


    0 0

     

    Permalink | Email this | Linking Blogs | Comments


    0 0

    Man Killed in UK Floods

    Heavy rain has caused severe flooding in parts of southwest England and Wales, killing at least one man, causing a major landslip in the city of Bath and leaving thousands without power.

     

    Permalink | Email this | Linking Blogs | Comments


    0 0


    National Weather Service

    Meteorologists with the National Weather Service's office in Sullivan, Wis., at first didn't know what to make of the unexpected images showing up on their radar over southern Wisconsin Friday evening.

    While there were a few flurries in the area, the radar returns were too strong for that - and seemed to be dispersing over time.

    It turns out the radar was actually picking up huge flocks of migrating Canada geese, the Weather Office says. One weather observer, Steve Skalecki, told the weather service ""the honking of geese was loud and almost continuous." A teenager from Lincolnshire apparently heard the birds, tweeting, "A flock of wild geese have just flown over my house, I heard them."


    As many as 100,000 to 200,000 geese migrating south stop to rest and refuel each year at the nearby Horicon Marsh, a national and state wildlife reserve, according to the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

     

    Permalink | Email this | Linking Blogs | Comments


    Warnning: Do NOT Get Caught While Searching!!
    Your IP : - Country : - City:
    Your ISP TRACKS Your Online Activity! Hide your IP ADDRESS with a VPN!
    Before you searching always remember to change your IP adress to not be followed!
    PROTECT YOURSELF & SUPPORT US! Purchase a VPN Today!
    0 0


    Conference flags are displayed ahead of the Doha Climate Change Conference, in Doha, Qatar. (AP)

    DOHA, Qatar (AP) - U.N. talks on a new climate pact resumed Monday in oil and gas-rich Qatar, where negotiators from nearly 200 countries will discuss fighting global warming and helping poor nations adapt to it.

    The two-decade-old talks have not fulfilled their main purpose: reducing the greenhouse gas emissions that scientists say are warming the planet.

    Attempts to create a new climate treaty failed in Copenhagen three years ago but countries agreed last year to try again, giving themselves a deadline of 2015 to adopt a new treaty.

    Several issues need to be resolved by then, including how to spread the burden of emissions cuts between rich and poor countries. That's unlikely to be decided in the Qatari capital of Doha, where negotiators will focus on extending the Kyoto Protocol, an emissions deal for industrialized countries, and trying to raise billions of dollars to help developing countries adapt to a shifting climate.

    "We owe it to our people, the global citizenry. We owe it to our children to give them a safer future than what they are currently facing," said South African Foreign Minister Maite Nkoana-Mashabane, who led last year's talks in Durban, South Africa.

    The U.N. process is often criticized, even ridiculed, both by climate activists who say the talks are too slow, and by those who challenge the scientific near-consensus that the global temperature rise is at least partly caused by human activity, primarily the burning of fossil fuels like coal and oil.

    Environmentalists found the choice of Qatar as host of the two-week conference ironic. The tiny Persian Gulf emirate owes its wealth to large resources of gas and oil and emits more greenhouse gases per capita than any other nation.

    Yet it hasn't announced any climate action in the U.N. process, and former Qatari oil minister Abdullah Bin Hamad Al-Attiyah didn't do so when he opened the conference Monday.

    "We should not concentrate on the per capita (emissions), we should concentrate on the amount from each country," Al-Attiyah told reporters. "I think Qatar is the right place to host" the conference, he added.

    The concentration of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide has jumped 20 percent since 2000, according to a U.N. report released last week. The report also showed that there is a growing gap between what governments are doing to curb emissions and what needs to be done to protect the world from potentially dangerous levels of warming.

    The goal of the U.N. talks is to keep the global temperature rise under 2 degrees C (3.6 F), compared to pre-industrial times.

    But efforts taken so far to rein in emissions, reduce deforestation and promote clean technology are not getting the job done. A recent projection by the World Bank showed temperatures are expected to increase by up to 4 degrees C (7.2 F) by 2100.

    "Climate change is no longer some distant threat for the future, but is with us today," said Greenpeace climate campaigner Martin Kaiser, who was also at the Doha talks. "At the end of a year that has seen the impacts of climate change devastate homes and families around the world, the need for action is obvious and urgent."

    Dangerous warming effects could include flooding of coastal cities and island nations, disruptions to agriculture and drinking water, the spread of diseases and the extinction of species.

    Many scientists also say that extreme weather events, such as Hurricane Sandy's onslaught on the U.S. East Coast, will become more frequent as the Earth warms, although it is impossible to attribute any individual event to climate change.

    The Kyoto Protocol, adopted in 1997, is the most important climate agreement reached in the U.N. process so far. It expires this year, so negotiators in Doha will try to extend it as a stopgap measure until a wider deal can be reached.

    The problem is that only the European Union and a handful of other countries - that together are behind less than 15 percent of global emissions - are willing to put down emissions targets for a second commitment period of Kyoto.

    The U.S. rejected Kyoto because it didn't impose any binding commitments on major developing countries such as India and China, which is now the world's No. 1 carbon emitter. The U.S. and other Western countries insist that the firewall in the climate talks between developing and developed countries must be removed so that the new treaty can apply to all nations.

    China and other developing countries want to maintain a clear division, saying climate change is mainly a legacy of Western industrialization and that their own emissions must be allowed to grow as their economies expand, lifting millions of people out of poverty.

    That discord scuttled attempts to forge a climate deal in Copenhagen in 2009 and risks a relapse in Doha as talks begin on a new global deal that is supposed to be adopted in 2015 and implemented in 2020.

    The rich-poor divide is also deepened by arguments over climate aid meant to help developing countries convert to cleaner energy sources and adapt their infrastructure to rising sea levels and other effects of global warming.

     

    Permalink | Email this | Linking Blogs | Comments


    0 0


    A dehumidifier, parked on Front Street near Wall Street in New York, blows dry air into the basement of a nearby building. (AP)

    NEW YORK (AP) - The hum of massive mobile generators, boilers and pumps emerges blocks from Manhattan's Financial District and turns into a steady din south of Wall Street - the now-familiar sound of an area laboring to recover from Superstorm Sandy.

    Other parts of the city have gotten mayoral visits and media attention after the Oct. 29 storm killed dozens of residents and tore apart homes in coastal neighborhoods. Less obvious were the millions upon million gallons of sea water that wreaked havoc on subterranean electrical panels and other internal infrastructure throughout lower Manhattan, making them unusable even after power was restored to the area.

    "There were waves on Wall Street, and it all ended up here," Mike Lahm, a building engineer who rode out the storm at 120 Wall Street, said during a recent tour of the skyscraper's basement.

    Nearly a month later, some of the high-rises that are home to investment banks, large law firms and luxury apartments have bounced back quickly. But others buildings remain eerily dark and vacant.

    Landlords have warned full power won't be back for weeks, if not months, leaving businesses and residents displaced and uncertain about when - and even whether - they'll return. JP Morgan Chase, the Daily News and the American Civil Liberties Union are among tenants still operating in satellite locations after getting washed out of their headquarters in lower Manhattan.

    Heavy flooding also hit a complex of multimillion-dollar apartments along the Hudson River, whose well-heeled owners - reportedly including Gwyneth Paltrow and Meryl Streep - could quietly retreat to second or third homes on higher and drier ground.

    "What you're looking at here is a mass exodus," downtown resident Gail Strum said as she retrieved some files and other belongings from a rental apartment building that's still without power. "It feels like there's no coming back."

    On paper, Strum's assessment sounds too pessimistic. The city Buildings Department declared only nine buildings in lower Manhattan unsafe because of structural damage from the storm, and the power company, Consolidated Edison, says all buildings citywide had access to electricity and steam power by Nov. 15.

    A real estate consulting firm that's tracking the lower Manhattan recovery, Jones Lang LaSalle, says 49 of the 183 office buildings in the business district were closed because of mechanical failures. By the latest count, at least half were back in full operation, even if it has meant relying on temporary power. More are expected to follow.

    "We see that as a very healthy pace," said John Wheeler, a Jones Lang LaSalle executive.

    One success story was 120 Wall Street, a 600,000-square-foot, 34-story skyscraper built near the East River that's home to nonprofits such as the National Urban League, the United Negro College Fund and the Eye-Bank for Sight Restoration.

    Even before Sandy hit, landlord Silverstein Properties got ahead of a scramble for recovery resources by securing portable diesel generators each capable of providing 2 megawatts of power. Afterward, the building brought in its own fuel tanker from Pennsylvania - and a security team from Florida to guard it - so it could keep the generators going during the gas crunch.

    Using a mix of generator power and restored Con Ed service, engineers had the elevators, lights and heat up and running by mid-November.

    To the tenants, "It's as if the building's operating normally," said Jeremy Moss, a vice president with Silverstein Properties.

    What tenants don't see in the bowels of 120 Wall Street is a thicket of temporary, exposed wiring that runs everywhere. The warning "LIVE WIRE. KEEP OUT" is spray-painted in red on the door of a room housing switches, fuses or circuit breakers after it was submerged. The air is clammy and musty - "the smell of the East River," said Lahm, the building engineer.

    Fearing the East River might one day try again to meet the Hudson, 120 Wall Street and other buildings are facing an even bigger, more expensive job: Moving critical infrastructure to higher floors or even roofs.

    "We're going to need to relocate equipment so history doesn't repeat itself," Moss said.

    Farther uptown, NYU Langone Medical Center and Bellevue Hospital Center had put generators on high floors where they could be protected in a flood. But they still suffered failures with Sandy, apparently because other critical components of the backup power system, such as fuel pumps and tanks, remained in basements just a block from the East River.

    While 120 Wall Street enjoys a degree of normalcy, other newer and taller glass towers around it remain shut as teams of contractors and workers struggle to restore power, phone and other services. Tractor-trailers providing emergency services such as "microbial remediation" crowd the streets. Cabs are few.

    Fire engines became a part of the mix on Friday with the report of a fire in the basement of another vacated office building at 55 Water St. - the address for financial services company Standard & Poor's and the city Department of Transportation - that left two dozen people suffering from smoke inhalation and sent four to a hospital. The cause wasn't immediately clear.

    The lower Manhattan disarray has also reached the courtroom. Last week, a resident of a still-evacuated luxury high-rise filed a $35 million lawsuit against his condo board and management company, accusing them of "gross negligence" in the wake of Sandy.

    The management company, Cooper Square Realty, fired back in a letter from its chief executive, David Kuperberg, claiming that contractors recruited from as far away as Wisconsin and Michigan have been working nonstop to tear out wet walls, carpeting and wallpaper to prevent mold; installing new generators; rebuilding a water pump; and mopping up residue left by oil-tainted salt water.

    "While Cooper Square Reality did not cause the storm, the company is doing everything it can" to get people back in their homes, Kuperberg wrote.

    The uncertainty also is evident at South Street Seaport, a cluster of early 19th-century mercantile buildings converted to retail shops and apartments. Usually teeming with tourists, the seaport remained a ghost town late last week, despite postcard-perfect weather.

    Inside a shut-down brew pub still without lights, workers wearing masks and white jumpsuits scrubbed down the bar, floor and tables. Many businesses, including Ann Taylor, Body Shop and Guess outlets, were still boarded up with plywood.

    Also shuttered was "Bodies ... The Exhibition," the show featuring dissected human cadavers that has been a fixture there since 2005. Its website says that due to "damage to our venue, we are closed until further notice."

    Some seaport residents have electricity back but no heat or hot water. Liz McKenna, 54, who was living in a third-floor apartment overlooking the East River when a deluge filled the entire first floor with water, said she expects to be able to move back in a couple of weeks - maybe.

    "That's only a guess," she said as she picked up her mail. "Look around. Nobody really knows how bad it is down here. ... We've been ignored."

    One of the few businesses to open its doors, Meade's bar and restaurant, had no customers at lunchtime.

    "We're open, but who are we open for?" said 28-year-old bartender Nichole Osborne. "All of my regulars are displaced."

    An etching on the front window, quoting Dylan Thomas, offered a glimmer of resolve: "Rage, rage against the dying of the light."

    PHOTOS ON SKYE: 25 Indelible Images from Superstorm Sandy

     

    Permalink | Email this | Linking Blogs | Comments


    0 0


    A proposed sea barrier at the mouth of the Arthur Kill waterway between the New York borough of Staten Island and New Jersey. (AP Photo/CDM Smith)

    Think Sandy was just a 100-year storm that devastated New York City? Imagine one just as bad, or worse, every three years.

    Prominent planners and builders say now is the time to think big to shield the city's core: a 5-mile barrier blocking the entryway to New York Harbor, an archipelago of man-made islets guarding the tip of Manhattan, or something like CDM Smith engineer Larry Murphy's 1,700-foot barrier - complete with locks for passing boats and a walkway for pedestrians - at the mouth of the Arthur Kill waterway between the borough of Staten Island and New Jersey.

    Act now, before the next deluge, and they say it could even save money in the long run.

    These strategies aren't just pipe dreams. Not only do these technologies already exist, some of the concepts have been around for decades and have been deployed successfully in other countries and U.S. cities.

    So if the science and engineering are sound, the long-term cost would actually be a savings, and the frequency and severity of more killer floods is inevitable, what's the holdup?

    Political will.

    Sandy's 43 deaths and estimated $26 billion in damages citywide might not be enough to galvanize the public and the politicians into action.

    "Unfortunately, they probably won't do anything until something bad happens," said CDM Smith's Murphy. "And I don't know if this will be considered bad enough."

    Sandy and her 14-foot surge not bad enough? By century's end, researchers forecast up to four feet higher seas, producing storm flooding akin to Sandy's as often as several times each decade. Even at current sea levels, Sandy's floodwaters filled subways, other tunnels and streets in parts of Manhattan.

    Without other measures, rebuilding will simply augment the future destruction. Yet that's what political leaders are emphasizing. President Barack Obama himself has promised to stand with the city "until the rebuilding is complete."

    So it might take a worse superstorm or two to really get the problem fixed.

    The focus on rebuilding irks people like Robert Trentlyon, a retired weekly newspaper publisher in lower Manhattan who is campaigning for sea barriers to protect the city: "The public is at the woe-is-me stage, rather than how-do-we-prevent-this-in-the-future stage."

    He belongs to a coterie of professionals and ordinary New Yorkers who want to take stronger action. Though pushing for a regional plan, they are especially intent on keeping Manhattan dry.

    The 13-mile-long island serves as the country's financial and entertainment nerve center. Within a 3-mile-long horseshoe-shaped flood zone around its southernmost quadrant are almost 500,000 residents and 300,000 jobs. Major storms swamp places like Wall Street and the site of the World Trade Center.

    Proven technology already exists to blunt or virtually block wind-whipped seas from overtaking lower Manhattan and much of the rest of New York City, according to a series of Associated Press interviews with engineers, architects and scientists and a review of research on flooding issues in the New York metropolitan area and around the globe.

    These strategies range from hard structures like mammoth barriers equipped with ship gates and embedded at entrances to the harbor, to softer and greener shoreline restraints like man-made marshes and barrier islands.

    Additional landfill, the old standby once used to extend Manhattan into the harbor, could further lift vulnerable highways and other sites beyond the reach of the seas.

    Even more simply, the rock and concrete seawalls and bulkheads that already ring lower Manhattan could be built up, but now perhaps with high-tech wave-absorbing or wave-reflecting materials.

    Seizing the initiative from government, business and academic circles have fleshed out several dramatic concepts to hold back water before it tops the shoreline. Two of the most elaborate proposals are:

    - A rock causeway, with 80-foot-high swinging ship gates, would sweep five miles across the entryway to inner New York Harbor from Sandy Hook, New Jersey, to Breezy Point, New York. To protect Manhattan, another shorter barrier is needed to the north, where the East River meets Long Island Sound, and another small blockage would go up near Sandy Hook. This New Jersey-side barrier and a network of levees on both ends of the causeway could help protect picturesque beach communities like Atlantic Highlands, in New Jersey to the west, and the Rockaways, in New York City to the east. This so-called outer barrier option was conceived for a professional symposium by the engineering firm CH2M HILL, which last year finished building a supersized 15-mile barrier guarding St. Petersburg, Russia, from Baltic Sea storms.

    - An extensive green makeover of lower Manhattan would install an elaborate drainage system beneath the streets, build up the very tip by 6 feet, pile 30-foot earthen mounds along the eastern edge, and create perimeter wetlands and a phalanx of artificial barrier islets - all to absorb the brunt of a huge storm surge. Plantings along the streets would help soak up runoff that floods the city sewers during heavy rains. This concept was worked up by DLANDSTUDIO and Architecture Research Office, two city architectural firms, for a museum project.

    What's missing is not viable ideas or proposals, but determination. Massive projects protecting other cities from the periodic ravages of stormy seas usually happened after catastrophes on a scale eclipsing even Sandy.

    It took the collapse of dikes, drowning deaths of more than 1,800 people, and evacuation of another 100,000 in 1953 for the Dutch to say "Never again!" They have since constructed the world's sturdiest battery of dikes, dams and barriers. No disaster on that scale has happened since.

    It took the breach of levees, a similar death toll, and flooding of 80 percent of New Orleans from Hurricane Katrina in 2005 to marshal the momentum finally to build a two-mile barricade against the Gulf of Mexico.

    A handful of seaside New England cities - Stamford, Connecticut; Providence, Rhode Island; and New Bedford, Massachusetts - have built smaller barriers after their own disasters.

    However, New York City, which mostly lies just several feet (meters) above sea level, has so far escaped the horrors visited elsewhere. Its leaders have been brushing off warnings of disaster for years.

    Retired geologist Jim Mellet of New Fairfield, Connecticut, recalls hearing a story told to him by the late Bill A. O'Leary, a retired city engineer at the time: He and other engineers, concerned about battering floods, had approached power broker Robert Moses more than 80 years ago to ask him to consider constructing a gigantic barrier to hold back storm tides at the entrance to the city's Upper Bay.

    Moses supposedly squashed the idea like an annoying bug. "According to Bill, he stood there uninterested, with his arms folded on his chest, and when they finished the presentation, he just said, 'No, it will destroy the view.'" Or perhaps he was already mulling other plans for the same site, where he would build the Verrazano Narrows Bridge years later.

    Many city projects, like the Westway highway plan of the 1970s and 1980s, died partly because of the impact they would have on the cherished view of water from the congested cityscape. Imagine, then, the political viability of a project that might further block access to the harbor or the view of the Statue of Liberty from the tip of Manhattan.

    "I can assure that many New Yorkers would have strong opinions about high seawalls," said an email from a retired New York commander of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Bud Griffis, who was involved in the permitting process for the failed Westway.

    However, global warming and its rising sea levels now make it harder simply to shrug off measures to shield the city from storms. Sandy drove 14-foot (4.27-meter) higher-than-normal seas - breaking a nearly 200-year-old record - into car and subway tunnels, streets of trendy neighborhoods, commuter highways and an electrical substation that shorted out nearly all of lower Manhattan.

    The late October storm left 43 dead in the city, and City Council Speaker Christine Quinn estimated at least $26 billion in damages and economic losses. The regional cost has been estimated at $50 billion, making Sandy the second most destructive storm in U.S. history after Katrina.

    Yet heavier storms are forecast. A 1995 study involving the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers envisioned a worst-case storm scenario for New York: High winds rip windows and masonry from skyscrapers, forcing pedestrians to flee to subway tunnels to avoid the falling debris. The tunnels soon flood.

    With its dense population and distinctive coastline, New York is especially vulnerable, with Manhattan at the center.

    The famous island can be pounded by storm surges from three sides: from the west via the Arthur Kill, from the south through the Upper Bay, and from the Long Island Sound through the East River. Relatively shallow depth offshore allows storm waters to pile up; the north-south shoreline of New Jersey and the east-west orientation of Long Island further channel gushing seas right at Manhattan.

    Some believe that Sandy was bad enough at least to advance more serious study of stronger protections. "I think the superstorm we had really put the fear of God into people, because no one really believed it would happen," said urban planner Juliana Maantay at Lehman College-City University of New York.

    But nearly all flood researchers interviewed by the AP voiced considerable skepticism about action in the foreseeable future. "In a half year's time, there will be other problems again, I can tell you," said Dutch urban planner Jeroen Aerts, who has studied storm protections around the world.

    William Solecki, a Manhattan-based Hunter College planner who has been at the center of city and state task forces on climate change, guessed that little more will be done to prevent future flooding beyond "nibbling at the edges" of the threat.

    In recent years, the city has been enforcing codes that require flood-zone builders to keep electrical and other critical systems above predicted high water from what was until recently thought to be a once-in-a-century storm. Sealing other key equipment against water has been encouraged. The city has tried to keep storm grates free of debris and has elevated subway entrances. The buzz word has been making things more "resilient."

    But this approach does little to stop swollen waters of a gigantic storm from pouring over lower Manhattan. "Resiliency means if you get knocked down, this is how you get back up again," huffs activist Trentlyon. "They just were talking about what you do afterward." He said Sandy's flood water rose to 5 feet (1.5 meters) at street level in Chelsea, where he lives on the western side of lower Manhattan.

    The city has at least toyed with the idea of barriers and even considered various locations in a 2008 study. "I have always considered that flood gates are something we should consider, but are not necessarily the immediate answer to rush toward," said Rohit Aggarwala, a Stanford University teacher who is former director of the New York mayor's Office of Long-Term Planning and Sustainability.

    Unswayed by Sandy, Mayor Michael Bloomberg and his assistants have been blunter. Bloomberg said barriers might not be worthwhile "even if you spent a fortune."

    Deputy Mayor Cas Holloway said no specific measures - whether more wetlands, higher seawalls or harbor barriers - have been ruled out because "there's no one-size-fits-all solution." But he compared sea barriers to the Maginot Line, the fortified line of defenses that Germany quickly sidestepped to conquer France at the beginning of World War II.

    "The city is not going to be totally stormproof, but I think it can be very adaptable," he added. He said that new flood maps informed by Sandy are being drawn up, and he suspects they will extend the zones where new developments must install critical equipment above flood level.

    Computer simulations indicate that hard barriers, which have worked elsewhere around the world, would do a good job of shielding New York neighborhoods behind them. But they'd actually make flooding worse just outside the barriers, where surging waters would pile up with nowhere to go.

    The patriarch of this research is Malcolm Bowman, a native New Zealander who leads a passionate cadre of barrier researchers at Stony Brook University on the northern shore of Long Island. His warnings have mostly gone unheeded. "I feel like a biblical prophet crying in the wilderness: 'The end is near!'" Bowman said.

    Unbowed, he continues to preach against incremental measures. "If you get a storm and a big oak tree falls on your house, then whether you fix your gutter doesn't matter," he said.

    In recent years, his logic has finally begun to resonate a bit more. Nicholas Kim, an oceanographer with engineering firm HDR HydroQual who studied with Bowman in the 1980s, said his mentor has been thinking about barriers since then: "Everybody said, 'You're crazy!' But now it's becoming clear that we need protection."

    Even massive structures don't shield everyone, though. A 2009 four-barrier study co-authored by Kim found that in a simulated storm, barriers still failed to protect large swaths of Queens and sections of other outlying boroughs with a total of more than 100,000 people.

    Researchers also have predicted at least a modest additional one-foot (30-centimeter) rise of stormy seas as water piles up outside the barriers. "If you're the guy just outside the barrier, and you're paying taxes and you're not included, you're not going to be very happy," said oceanographer Larry Swanson at Stony Brook University.

    How such barriers would affect water movement, silt and marine life also remains an open question requiring further study for each case.

    The scale and costs of hard barrier schemes have further put off many critics. After flooding from Hurricane Irene last year, city representatives asked Aerts, the Dutch planner, to compare the cost and benefits of barriers to existing approaches. His initial analysis will not be finished until February, but his early cost estimate for barriers and associated dikes for New York City is $15 billion to $27 billion - comparable to that of the record-setting $24 billion Big Dig that reshaped Boston's waterfront - not to block storms, but to unblock traffic and views of the waterfront.

    Barrier defenders counter by pointing to the cost of storm damages. Stony Brook meteorologist Brian Colle said: "When you think of the cost of a Sandy, which is running in the billions, these barriers are basically going to pay for themselves in one or two storms." Advocates say tolls on trains or cars riding atop a barrier could help finance the project.

    While appealing for rebuilding, Council Speaker Quinn also has said that "the time for casual debate is over" and called for a bold mix of resiliency with grander protective structures. She has estimated the cost of her plan at $20 billion.

    Other massive protection schemes, like the green makeover of lower Manhattan, also would probably run into the billions. And soft protections are meant only to defuse, not stop, rising waters. Sandy battered parts of Long Island behind barrier islands and wetlands.

    Nor is it clear that Manhattan has enough space to fashion more extensive wetlands of the sort that help protect the Gulf Coast, however imperfectly. "New York is too far gone for wetlands," said Griffis, the retired Army Corps commander for New York.

    Sen. Charles Schumer has announced he will spearhead efforts to request a corps study of whether barriers or other options would work better. However, it remains unclear if Congress would be willing to fund such a study, which would undoubtedly take several years and cost millions of dollars.

    And even before a dime has been appropriated, the corps is lowering expectations. Says spokesman Chris Gardner: "You can't protect everywhere completely at all times."

    PHOTOS ON SKYE: 25 Indelible Images from Superstorm Sandy

     

    Permalink | Email this | Linking Blogs | Comments


    0 0


    This map shows snowfall from the most likely scenario. If the storm ends up being very weak, less snow will fall over the entire region. If the storm ends up shifting its track farther east, a bit more snow would reach the I-95 corridor and little or no snow would fall over the Ohio Valley and central Appalachians.

    By Alex Sosnowski

    A storm swinging up from the South will spread a period of snow (and rain) from a portion of the Ohio Valley to part of the Northeast spanning Monday night into Tuesday night.

    The premise of a single, moderate storm tracking northeastward entertained last week by AccuWeather.com meteorologists appears to be the most likely scenario.

    Enough snow and slush will occur in some locations to slow travel and perhaps foil plans.
    According to meteorologist Steve Travis, "While an exceptionally heavy snowfall is not foreseen, enough snow to sweep, shovel or plow will occur from northeastern Kentucky to northern West Virginia, northwestern Virginia, northern Maryland, southern and eastern Pennsylvania and northern New Jersey."

    SEE MORE WEATHER FORECASTS AT ACCUWEATHER.COM.

    Cities within this swath of snow that could receive up to 3 inches of snow include Morgantown, W.Va., Hagerstown, Md., Harrisburg, Reading and Allentown, Pa., and Netcong, N.J.

    Major highways that can experience low visibility and road conditions ranging from wet to slushy to snow-covered for a time during several hours include portions of the Pennsylvania Turnpike, I-68 and I-78, as well as portions of I-64, I-70, I-80, I-81, I-83 and I-84.

    Temperatures will be marginally cold enough for snow at critical levels in the atmosphere.
    According to Meteorologist Brian Edwards, "This will likely be a situation where it will have to snow hard to accumulate on roads and sidewalks in the city of Philadelphia and in Manhattan."

    Roads are most likely to be snow covered in portions of West Virginia, western Maryland and south-central Pennsylvania late Monday night into Tuesday morning, as the snow will get a jump start in this area, prior to slight daytime warming.

    In addition, where snow lingers later in the afternoon and evening in portions of southeastern New England and perhaps Long Island, road surface temperatures may cool enough to allow a small amount of slush and snow on the roads and sidewalks.

    Just enough precipitation can reach into part of the Ohio Valley to cause slippery spots Monday night, setting the stage for Tuesday morning's drive delays.

    As is often the case with storms moving up from the lower Mississippi Valley, rain will fall on the southern flank. Locally severe thunderstorms will affect part of the Deep South.

    It is quite possible a person driving from Center City in Philadelphia into interior southeastern Pennsylvania could encounter conditions ranging from wet roads to heavy snow and slushy conditions in as little as 10 miles.

    This band of accumulating snow is likely to set up north and west of Washington, D.C., and Baltimore.

    Snow can mix in around Washington and Baltimore, but with temperatures above freezing, the storm will be hard-pressed to bring an accumulation to road surfaces. It would have to snow very hard to do so.

    Whether or not southern New England picks up more than an inch of snow will depend on how quickly the storm strengthens and spins over the Atlantic.

    Southwestern New England is forecast to be north of the heavy precipitation. The crest of the storm may pass during the middle of the day.

    Perhaps if the storm gets its second wind Tuesday night, heavy snow could reach back into southeastern Massachusetts, Long Island, Rhode Island, part of Connecticut at the last minute with a few inches of the white stuff.

    PHOTOS ON SKYE: Before and After Superstorm Sandy

     

    Permalink | Email this | Linking Blogs | Comments


    0 0

     

    Permalink | Email this | Linking Blogs | Comments


    Warnning: Do NOT Get Caught While Searching!!
    Your IP : - Country : - City:
    Your ISP TRACKS Your Online Activity! Hide your IP ADDRESS with a VPN!
    Before you searching always remember to change your IP adress to not be followed!
    PROTECT YOURSELF & SUPPORT US! Purchase a VPN Today!
    0 0


    A general view shows the opening ceremony of the 18th United Nations climate change conference in Doha on Nov. 26, 2012. (Karim Jaafar/AFP/Getty Images)

    DOHA, Qatar (AP) - Anticipating an onslaught of criticism from poor nations, the United States claimed "enormous" strides in reducing greenhouse emissions at the opening of U.N. climate talks Monday, despite failing to join other industrialized nations in committing to binding cuts.

    The pre-emptive U.S. approach underscores one of the major showdowns expected at the two-week conference as China pushes developed countries to take an even greater role in tackling global warming.

    Speaking for a coalition of developed nations known as the G77, China's delegate, Su Wei, said rich nations should become party to an extended Kyoto Protocol - an emissions deal for some industrialized countries that the Americans long ago rejected - or at least make "comparable mitigation commitments."

    The United States rejected Kyoto because it didn't impose any binding commitments on major developing countries such as India and China, which is now the world's No. 1 carbon emitter.

    American delegate Jonathan Pershing offered no new sweeteners to the poor countries, only reiterating what the United States has done to tackle global warming: investing heavily in clean energy, doubling fuel efficiency standards and reducing emissions from coal-fired power plants. Pershing also said the United States would not increase its earlier commitment of cutting emissions by 17 percent below 2005 levels by 2020. It is half way to that target.

    "I would suggest those who don't follow what the U.S. is doing may not be informed of the scale and extent of the effort, but it's enormous," Pershing said.

    "It doesn't mean enough is being done. It's clear the global community, and that includes us, has to do more if we are going to succeed at avoiding the damages projected in a warming world," Pershing added. "It is not to say we haven't acted. We have and we have acted with enormous urgency and singular purpose."

    The battles between rich and poor nations have often undermined talks in the past decade and stymied efforts to reach a deal to keep global temperatures from rising more than 2 degrees C (3.6 F), compared to preindustrial times. Efforts taken in the absence of a deal to rein in emissions, reduce deforestation and promote clean technology are not getting the job done. A recent projection by the World Bank showed temperatures are expected to increase by up to 4 degrees C (7.2 F) by 2100.

    Countries are hoping to build on the momentum of last year's talks in Durban, South Africa, where nearly 200 nations agreed to restart stalled negotiations with a deadline of 2015 to adopt a new treaty and extend Kyoto between five and eight years. The problem is that only the European Union and a handful of other nations - which together account for less than 15 percent of global emissions - are willing to commit to that.

    Delegates in the Qatari capital of Doha are also hoping to raise billions of dollars to help developing countries adapt to a shifting climate.

    "We owe it to our people, the global citizenry. We owe it to our children to give them a safer future than what they are currently facing," said South African Foreign Minister Maite Nkoana-Mashabane, who led last year's talks in Durban.

    Environmentalists fear holding the talks in Qatar - the world's biggest per capita emitter - could slow progress. They argue that the Persian Gulf emirate has shown little interest in climate talks and has failed to reign in its lavish lifestyle and big-spending ways.

    There was hope among activists that Qatar might use Monday's opening speech to set the tone of the conference. But Abdullah Bin Hamad Al-Attiyah, the president of the conference and a former Qatari oil minister, didn't offer any voluntary emission targets or climate funding for poor nations.

    "Some countries, especially the one where we are sitting, have the potential to decrease their carbon emissions. They have the highest per capita emissions, so they can do a lot," said Wael Hmaidan, a Lebanese activist and director of the Climate Action Network.

    "If nations that are poorer than Qatar, like India and Mexico, can make pledges to reduce their carbon emissions, then countries in the region, especially Qatar, should easily be able to do it. ... They still haven't proven they are serious about climate change."

    Al-Attiyah defended Qatar's environmental record at a later news conference, insisting it was working to reduce emissions from gas flaring and its oil fields. Qatar is already doing plenty to help poor countries with financing, he said, adding that it was unfair to focus on per capita emissions.

    "We should not concentrate on per capita. We should concentrate on the amount and quantity that each country produces individually," al-Attiyah said. "The quantity is the biggest challenge, not per capita."

    The concentration of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide has jumped 20 percent since 2000, according to a U.N. report released last week. The report also showed that there is a growing gap between what governments are doing to curb emissions and what needs to be done to protect the world from potentially dangerous levels of warming.

    At the same time, many scientists say extreme weather events, such as Hurricane Sandy's onslaught on the U.S. East Coast, will become more frequent as the Earth warms, although it is impossible to attribute any individual event to climate change. The rash of violent weather in the U.S., including widespread droughts and a record number of wildfires this summer, has again put climate change on the radar.

    "While none of these individual events are necessarily because of climate change, they are certainly consistent with what we anticipate will happen in a warming world," Pershing said. "The combination of these events is certainly changing minds of Americans and making clear to people at home the consequences of increased growth in emissions."

    In Washington, Rep. Ed Markey, D-Mass., urged the U.S. delegation at the talks to "heed the warnings from Sandy and other extreme weather supercharged by climate change."

    "If the United States does not aggressively pursue sharp reductions in carbon pollution following the droughts, storms and other extreme weather events we have endured, the rest of the world will doubt our sincerity to address climate change," Markey said. "It's time to attack the carbon problem head on, and adapt to a climate already changed for the worse."

    Many countries referenced Hurricane Sandy as a rallying cry for tough action to cap emissions, including a group of small island nations that said the monster storm may have jolted the world to recognize "that we are all in this together."

    "When the tragedies occur far away from the media spotlight, they are too often ignored or forgotten," the island nations said in a statement.

     

    Permalink | Email this | Linking Blogs | Comments


    0 0

    Gravel Pit Pillows - Aggy and the Tippie Brothers. on Pinkbike

    A mountain biker and a couple of snowboarders shoot down a massive gravel pit in Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada. It's all fun and games until someone gets hurt -- actually, if you're these guys, it's still fun and games, even after one of them winds up with a bloody back.

    RELATED ON SKYE: The World's Most Extreme Sports

     

    Permalink | Email this | Linking Blogs | Comments


    0 0

    Nuisance Snow

    A quick-moving snowstorm will shift into the Northeast today, but its impact is expected to be minor. Some light accumulation will occur, bringing anywhere from a coating of snow to as much as 4 inches in some areas. A wintry mix will likely occur in Boston, New York City and Philadelphia.

    RELATED ON SKYE: The 10 Snowiest Places on Earth

     

    Permalink | Email this | Linking Blogs | Comments


    0 0


    The roller coaster from an amusement pier rests in the Atlantic Ocean in Seaside Heights, N.J., after the region was pounded by Superstorm Sandy. (AP)

    SEASIDE HEIGHTS, N.J. (AP) - A roller coaster swept off a New Jersey amusement pier by Superstorm Sandy won't remain as a tourist attraction partially submerged in the ocean.

    Seaside Heights Mayor Bill Akers tells the Asbury Park Press the town and the owners of the Casino Pier are in talks to remove what remains of the Jet Star Roller Coaster.

    The mayor last week told a TV station that the coaster would make a "great tourist attraction." But the mayor now says that "was not the brightest comment."

    Casino Pier officials say they are still assessing the damage.

    The mayor says construction of a new boardwalk should begin in January and be ready by Memorial Day.

    PHOTOS ON SKYE: 25 Indelible Images from Superstorm Sandy

     

    Permalink | Email this | Linking Blogs | Comments


    0 0


    The Noatak National Preserve in Alaska with erosion and ground degradation because permafrost is thawing more from global warming. (AP Photo/Edward Schuur, University of Florida)

    DOHA, Qatar (AP) - The United Nations is warning that a thawing in the permafrost that covers almost a quarter of the northern hemisphere could "significantly amplify global warming."

    The warning came in a U.N. report released as climate talks intensified on Tuesday in Qatar.

    The report says the dangers of carbon dioxide and methane emissions from warming permafrost are becoming an emerging issue among climate scientists. These dangers have so far not been factored in projections about future temperature rises.

    Representatives from over 200 countries are negotiating a climate deal in Doha that would keep global temperatures from rising more than 3.6 degrees F - compared to preindustrial times - by 2100.

    The World Bank has projected temperatures to increase by up to 7.2 degrees F by then.

    RELATED ON SKYE: Off-the-Charts Hottest and Coldest Places on Earth

     

    Permalink | Email this | Linking Blogs | Comments


    Warnning: Do NOT Get Caught While Searching!!
    Your IP : - Country : - City:
    Your ISP TRACKS Your Online Activity! Hide your IP ADDRESS with a VPN!
    Before you searching always remember to change your IP adress to not be followed!
    PROTECT YOURSELF & SUPPORT US! Purchase a VPN Today!

older | 1 | .... | 24 | 25 | (Page 26) | 27 | 28 | .... | 204 | newer